Accurate, Focused Research on Law, Technology and Knowledge Discovery Since 2002

Category Archives: Knowledge Management

Lessons about Twitter from New York Times’ social media desk

Michael Roston is a staff editor for social media at The New York Times: “On a daily basis we publish many articles that need an alternative approach to attract readers that might come to us from social media. But there are also a significant number of instances where we shouldn’t try too hard to writeContinue Reading

Intellectual Property and Trust in the Age of Digital Media

Tonia Ries – Media Sources: Search Engines Now Most Trusted “The 2015 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals a new formula for building trust, one in which engagement carries a multiplier effect. Engagement and ongoing communication and dialogue with multiple stakeholders are both more critical than ever, but also more difficult to execute well. Today’s reality isContinue Reading

The Cobweb – Can the Internet be archived?

The New Yorker – Annals of Technology. January 26, 2015 Issue. The Cobweb Can the Internet be archived? By Jill Lepore “…The Web dwells in a never-ending present. It is—elementally—ethereal, ephemeral, unstable, and unreliable. Sometimes when you try to visit a Web page what you see is an error message: “Page Not Found.” This isContinue Reading

Training Students to Extract Value from Big Data

“As the availability of high-throughput data-collection technologies, such as information-sensing mobile devices, remote sensing, internet log records, and wireless sensor networks has grown, science, engineering, and business have rapidly transitioned from striving to develop information from scant data to a situation in which the challenge is now that the amount of information exceeds a human’sContinue Reading

Transforming the business through social tools

“After years of rapid and increasing adoption, the use of social technologies has become a common business practice. Now the responses to McKinsey’s latest survey on these technologies indicate that in certain functions (namely, sales and marketing), companies are applying social tools extensively and becoming more digital organizations overall. We asked executives about their companies’Continue Reading

Do Experts or Collective Intelligence Write with More Bias?

Do Experts or Collective Intelligence Write with More Bias? Evidence from Encyclopædia Britannica and Wikipedia. Shane Greenstein, Feng Zhu. Working Paper 15-023. October 10, 2014. “Britannica and Wikipedia are sources that aspire to provide comprehensive information. They both face similar challenges over the length, tone, and factual basis of controversial, unverifiable, and subjective content. SuchContinue Reading

NAL Unveils New Search Engine for Published USDA Research

“The National Agricultural Library (NAL) has unveiled PubAg, a user-friendly search engine that gives the public enhanced access to research published by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. NAL is part of USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS). PubAg, which can be found at PubAg.nal.usda.gov, is a new portal for literature searches and full-text access ofContinue Reading

Second Annual Report on How Personal Technology is Changing our Lives

“Microsoft’s second annual survey of Internet users around the world, released here in advance of the World Economic Forum that is taking place this week in Davos, Switzerland, shows that fifteen years into the 21st century, Internet users still think overwhelmingly that personal technology is making the world better and more vital. Large majorities ofContinue Reading

Reading the Mind in the Eyes or Reading between the Lines?

Engel D, Woolley AW, Jing LX, Chabris CF, Malone TW (2014) Reading the Mind in the Eyes or Reading between the Lines? Theory of Mind Predicts Collective Intelligence Equally Well Online and Face-To-Face. PLoS ONE 9(12): e115212. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0115212 “Recent research with face-to-face groups found that a measure of general group effectiveness (called “collective intelligence”) predictedContinue Reading

Immunologist argues that the world is making us sick

The chemicals in our everyday lives are, argues immunologist Claudia Miller, by Jill Neimark “Claudia Miller has spent 30 years hammering out a theory to explain the contemporary surge in perplexing, multi-symptom illnesses—from autism to Gulf War Syndrome—which represent a Kuhnian shift in medicine. She calls her theory “TILT,” short for Toxicant Induced Loss ofContinue Reading

New on LLRX – Step 1 to Information Literacy

Via LLRX.com – Step 1 to Information Literacy – This is the first of a three part series by Lorette Weldon. She discusses the role of “The Three T’s” – talking, tinkering, and traveling, in relationship to building a bond between librarians and customers seeking reference and research services.

NISO Recommended Practice on Metadata Indicators for Accessibility – Licensing of E-Content

“The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has published a new Recommended Practice on Access License and Indicators (NISO RP-22-2015) that defines metadata to be used to indicate free-to-read content and a link to license terms for the use/re-use of that content. Developed by the NISO Working Group on Access License and Indicators (formerly Open AccessContinue Reading