European Security Agency Report – Risks and benefits of emerging life-logging applications

by Sabrina I. Pacifici on November 13, 2011

  • To log or not to log? – Risks and benefits of emerging life-logging applications, November 11, 2011 via European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA) – “European Union (EU) agency which acts as a centre of expertise for the EU Member States and European institutions. It gives advice and recommendations on good practice, and acts as a “switchboard” for exchanging knowledge and information. The agency also facilitates contacts between the European institutions, the Member States, and private business and industry.”

  • “Recording aspects of one’s life, or life-logging, has a long established history in human society, but it is undergoing transformational change in terms of depth, volume and type of data. Before the 20th century, life-logging was restricted to recordings on paper media and involved written accounts, such as books, diaries, or collections of letters between people as well as person-constructed images such as drawings or paintings. By the 20th century, the media had broadened to include still photographic images, sound and moving images and most families kept at least an image life-log in the form of a photo album. By the end of the 20th century, most of these life-log data were digitally recorded with both the resolution and frequency of recording dramatically increasing year on year. Paper diaries and letters gave way to blogs, e-mail, and social networking status updates with the significant difference that the latter were potentially recorded forever and with a vastly more complete history than the episodic fragments of days gone by.”
  • Appendix I Scenario Building and Analysis Template, accompanying the deliverable “To log or not to log? – Risks and benefits of emerging life-logging applications”.
    File To log or not to log? – Risks and benefits of emerging life-logging applications [Appendix II]
  • Appendix II Risk Assessment Spreadsheet, accompanying the deliverable “To log or not to log? – Risks and benefits of emerging life-logging applications”

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