Major Study Finds That Overall Population Health in U.S. Has Improved

by Sabrina I. Pacifici on July 10, 2013

“In a major study that includes data on the status of population health from 34 countries from 1990-2010, overall population health improved in the U.S. during this period, including an increase in life expectancy; however, illness and chronic disability now account for nearly half of the health burden and improvements in the U.S. have not kept pace with advances in population health in other wealthy nations, according to a study published online by JAMA… The researchers found that U.S. life expectancy for both sexes combined increased from 75.2 years in 1990 to 78.2 years in 2010; during the same period, healthy life expectancy increased from 65.8 years to 68.1 years. In 2010, diseases and injuries with the largest number of years of life lost due to premature death were ischemic heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and road injury (which includes bicycle, motorcycle, motor vehicle, and pedestrian injury). Age-standardized YLL rates increased for Alzheimer disease, drug use disorders, chronic kidney disease, kidney cancer, and falls.”

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