The Environmental Price Tag on a Ton of Mountaintop Removal Coal

by Sabrina I. Pacifici on September 16, 2013

Brian D. Lutz, Emily S. Bernhardt, William H. Schlesinger (2013). The Environmental Price Tag on a Ton of Mountaintop Removal Coal PLOS ONE DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073203

“While several thousand square kilometers of land area have been subject to surface mining in the Central Appalachians, no reliable estimate exists for how much coal is produced per unit landscape disturbance. We provide this estimate using regional satellite-derived mine delineations and historical county-level coal production data for the period 1985–2005, and further relate the aerial extent of mining disturbance to stream impairment and loss of ecosystem carbon sequestration potential. To meet current US coal demands, an area the size of Washington DC would need to be mined every 81 days. A one-year supply of coal would result in ~2,300 km of stream impairment and a loss of ecosystem carbon sequestration capacity comparable to the global warming potential of >33,000 US homes. For the first time, the environmental impacts of surface coal mining can be directly scaled with coal production rates.”

Previous post:

Next post: