Who Gives A Tweet? Evaluating Microblog Content Value

by Sabrina I. Pacifici on February 20, 2012

Who Gives A Tweet? Evaluating Microblog Content Value, Paul André – Carnegie Mellon; Michael Bernstein – MIT, and Kurt Luther – Georgia Tech, February 2012

  • “While microblog readers have a wide variety of reactions to the content they see, studies have tended to focus on extremes such as retweeting and unfollowing. To understand the broad continuum of reactions in-between, which are typically not shared publicly, we designed a website that collected the first large corpus of follower ratings on Twitter updates. Using our dataset of over 43,000 voluntary ratings, we find that nearly 36% of the rated tweets are worth reading, 25% are not, and 39% are middling. These results suggest that users tolerate a large amount of less-desired content in their feeds. We find that users value information sharing and random thoughts above
    me-oriented or presence updates. We also offer insight into evolving social norms, such as lack of context and misuse of @mentions and hashtags. We discuss implications for emerging practice and tool design.”

  • See also via Atlantic, Be Better at Twitter: The Definitive, Data-Driven Guide
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