Accurate, Focused Research on Law, Technology and Knowledge Discovery Since 2002

Category Archives: Libraries

Monographs and open access

“The Monographs and Open Access Project was set up to consider the place of monographs in the arts, humanities and social science disciplines, and how they fit into the developing world of open access to research. The project was led by Geoffrey Crossick, Distinguished Professor of Humanities at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, and was commissioned by HEFCE in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Evidence to support the project was gathered through an programme of consultations, surveys, data-gathering and research activities. The research was supported and shaped by an Expert Reference Group of publishers, academics, librarians, funders, open access experts in the UK and overseas. The main findings of the report are as follows:

  • Monographs are a vitally important and distinctive vehicle for research communication, and must be sustained in any moves to open access. The availability of printed books alongside the open-access versions will be essential.
  • Contrary to many perceptions, it would not be appropriate to talk of a crisis of the monograph; this does not mean that monographs are not facing challenges, but the arguments for open access would appear to be for broader and more positive reasons than solving some supposed crisis.
  • Open access offers both short- and long-term advantages for monograph publication and use; many of these are bound up with a transition to digital publishing that has not been at the same speed as that for journals.
  • There is no single dominant emerging business model for supporting open-access publishing of monographs; a range of approaches will coexist for some time and it is unlikely that any single model will emerge as dominant. Policies will therefore need to be flexible.

HEFCE will consider this report and discuss its policy implications with other research funders including AHRC and ESRC, recognising that any steps towards policies for open-access monographs should be preceded by a thorough process of consultation and engagement.”

The Public Library: A Photographic Love Letter to Humanity’s Greatest Sanctuary of Knowledge, Freedom, and Democracy

“A library is many things,” E.B. White once wrote in a letter to the children of a little town to inspire them to fall in love with their new library. “But particularly it is a place where books live, and where you can get in touch with other people, and other thoughts, through books… BooksContinue Reading

OCLC Research launches Terms of Use and Reuse for Finding Aid Metadata project

“OCLC Research is facilitating a focused discussion about metadata in finding aids within a scoped effort to produce guidelines for terms of use and reuse of finding aid metadata. We have convened a working group whose members are in contact with archival authorities and associations internationally, such as the Society of American Archivists and theContinue Reading

The Cobweb – Can the Internet be archived?

The New Yorker – Annals of Technology. January 26, 2015 Issue. The Cobweb Can the Internet be archived? By Jill Lepore “…The Web dwells in a never-ending present. It is—elementally—ethereal, ephemeral, unstable, and unreliable. Sometimes when you try to visit a Web page what you see is an error message: “Page Not Found.” This isContinue Reading

Do Experts or Collective Intelligence Write with More Bias?

Do Experts or Collective Intelligence Write with More Bias? Evidence from Encyclopædia Britannica and Wikipedia. Shane Greenstein, Feng Zhu. Working Paper 15-023. October 10, 2014. “Britannica and Wikipedia are sources that aspire to provide comprehensive information. They both face similar challenges over the length, tone, and factual basis of controversial, unverifiable, and subjective content. SuchContinue Reading

NAL Unveils New Search Engine for Published USDA Research

“The National Agricultural Library (NAL) has unveiled PubAg, a user-friendly search engine that gives the public enhanced access to research published by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. NAL is part of USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS). PubAg, which can be found at PubAg.nal.usda.gov, is a new portal for literature searches and full-text access ofContinue Reading

New on LLRX – Step 1 to Information Literacy

Via LLRX.com – Step 1 to Information Literacy – This is the first of a three part series by Lorette Weldon. She discusses the role of “The Three T’s” – talking, tinkering, and traveling, in relationship to building a bond between librarians and customers seeking reference and research services.

NISO Recommended Practice on Metadata Indicators for Accessibility – Licensing of E-Content

“The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has published a new Recommended Practice on Access License and Indicators (NISO RP-22-2015) that defines metadata to be used to indicate free-to-read content and a link to license terms for the use/re-use of that content. Developed by the NISO Working Group on Access License and Indicators (formerly Open AccessContinue Reading

Living Knowledge: The British Library 2015-2023

“This short publication lays out the key strategic priorities for the British Library on its journey to its 50th anniversary and beyond, and sets them in a framework of six purposes which explain, as simply and clearly as we can, the enduring ways in which the public funding we receive helps to deliver tangible publicContinue Reading

Google – Still in the Search

How Google Search Dealt With Mobile – The Never Ending Search by Steven Levy. In-depth reporting and writing about the continuing evolution of Google search from both a tactical and strategic perspective. For consumers, researchers, librarians, lawyers and educators, this is a must read. It takes time, focus and mindfulness to read long articles inContinue Reading

Museums Now Able to Digitize Thousands of Artifacts in Just Hours

Smithsonian.com: “As the Smithsonian works to digitize its collection of 137 million items, the Digitization Program Office has turned to the National Numismatic Collection housed at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History along with other legal tender such as bank notes, tax stamps and war bonds. The 250,000 pieces of paper will become theContinue Reading

Improving Wikipedia Show and Tell webinar recording available

OCLC – “View this webinar recording to learn how to contribute to Wikipedia, the world’s largest encyclopedia that anyone can edit. See presenters share their processes for adding links to collections and other content to Wikipedia. Presentations include both lessons learned and successes.”