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Category Archives: Civil Liberties

Why I Opt Out of Facial Recognition

Fortune – Robert Hackett – “When Fortune employees moved into a new office building in Manhattan a few months ago, we had the option to sign up for facial recognition scanning. This meant we could access the premises without showing an authorized ID badge. I ruminated on the convenience for some time. Imagine: No more pausing at the turnstile. No more fumbling around in your pockets. No more accidentally forgetting your ID badge at home. Simply flash a smile at a little camera and—presto—you’re in. What a dream come true! Naturally, I declined the option…If I lose my ID badge, I can get a new one. But I have only one face.” [See also DHS wants to expand airport face recognition scans to include US citizens.]

CBP Starts Process to Include U.S. Citizens in Facial Recognition Program

NextGov: “U.S. citizens wary of facial biometric technology can opt-out of Customs and Border Protection’s face-scanning programs, though that would change under a proposed rule. CBP has been pushing the use of facial recognition technologies at land, sea and air ports as a means of meeting a longstanding congressional mandate to use biometrics in the… Continue Reading

Visualizing the November Democratic Debate

Center for Data Innovation: “Bloomberg has created a series of data visualizations illustrating the amount of time presidential candidates spent discussing topics in the most recent Democratic debate. The visualizations show that topics such as foreign policy and democracy replaced healthcare and gun control as the most discussed issues. In addition, the visualizations demonstrate that… Continue Reading

I Invented the World Wide Web. Here’s How We Can Fix It

The New York Times Opinion – I Invented the World Wide Web. Here’s How We Can Fix It. I wanted the web to serve humanity. It’s not too late to live up to that promise. By Tim Berners-Lee: “My parents were mathematicians. My mother helped code one of the first stored-program computers — the Manchester… Continue Reading

Police can keep Ring camera video forever and share with whomever they’d like

Stars and Stripes – “Police officers who download videos from homeowners’ Ring doorbell cameras can keep them forever and share them with whomever they’d like without providing evidence of a crime, the Amazon-owned firm told a lawmaker earlier this month. More than 600 police forces across the country have entered into partnerships with the camera… Continue Reading

Opinion: Workers Deserve a Say in Automation

Opinion – By Sherrod Brown, Ohio’s senior US senator and Liz Schuler, secretary-treasurer of the AFL-CIO: “The Workers’ Right to Training Act allows employees to evolve as their employers adopt new tech. When the global economy shifted in the late 19th century, working people were the first to adapt. They moved to cities like Cincinnati,… Continue Reading

PA Supreme Court – Police Can’t Force You to Tell Them Your Password

EFF: “The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police. In a 4-3 decision in Commonwealth v. Davis, the court found that disclosing a password is “testimony” protected by the Fifth… Continue Reading

Pete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues November 15, 2019

Via LLRX – Pete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues November 15, 2019 – Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly… Continue Reading

Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software

Via LLRX – Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software – Lawyer and Legal Technology Evangelist Nicole L. Black discusses the “reckless social experiment” that facial surveillance represents across all aspects of life in America. It is the norm on social media, in air travel, as a mechanism… Continue Reading