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Category Archives: Education

How Will Legal Education And Training Keep Pace With Change?

Forbes: “Dell Technologies authored a report by 20 tech, business and academic experts projecting 85% of jobs that will exist in 2030 have yet to be invented. Dell issued a statement that “The pace of change will be so rapid that people will learn ‘in the moment’ using new technologies such as augmented reality and virtual reality. The ability to gain new knowledge will be more valuable than the knowledge itself.”  Many lawyers might think this does not apply to them, but think again. Deloitte released a 2016 report on the legal industry predicting “profound reforms” over the next decade. Several factors were cited including: automation, the rise of millennials in the workplace, and changing client demands. Deloitte projected a 39% loss of legal sector jobs.  That will be offset by new positions in data analytics, legal technology architecting and design, risk mitigation, and other yet-to-be-identified fields. Consider that Deloitte has the world’s largest market share of legal services. The “profound reforms” are already underway…”

1500 US Museums offer free entrance on Museum Day

Smithsonian: “On Saturday, September 22, more than 1,500 museums will open their doors for free as part of Museum Day. Organized by Smithsonian magazine, the annual event includes free admission to museums and cultural institutions in all 50 states. Participating museums range from large, popular institutions like the Zoo Miami to quirky and fascinating specialty… Continue Reading

Internet Archive – Revised wish list now available: 1.5M books we want

“Earlier this year we released our Open Libraries wish list, which brought together four datasets to help inform our collection development priorities for Open Libraries.  After working with the wish list for a few months and reviewing our approach, we decided to make a few revisions to the ways in which we brought together the… Continue Reading

Want to defend democracy? Start with your public library.

Washington Post Opinion: “In “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” the character Ron — channeling his friend Hermione — says to Harry Potter: “When in doubt, go to the library.” In the United States today, there is plenty to doubt. Complex arguments are being whittled down to 280 characters. And of course, the president… Continue Reading

Hard Words Why aren’t kids being taught to read?

American Public Media Reports – “…The basic assumption that underlies typical reading instruction in many schools is that learning to read is a natural process, much like learning to talk. But decades of scientific research has revealed that reading doesn’t come naturally. The human brain isn’t wired to read. Kids must be explicitly taught how… Continue Reading

The Marine Conservation Planning Database

The Conservation Planning Database: “Given international policy targets and growing recognition of a biodiversity crisis, the number and total extent of protected areas is set to increase significantly in the next few decades. To ensure this planned expansion is effective in halting biodiversity loss, it is critical that new protected areas (and other conservation actions)… Continue Reading

Even in Better Times, Many Americans Are Farther Behind. Here’s Why.

The New York Times: “Americans’ household earnings are finally stretching back to their pre-recession heights. But feeling secure and comfortable isn’t only a measure of how much money you have. It’s also a measure of how much you have compared with others. For many, that is one reason that recent financial progress may seem overshadowed… Continue Reading

31 Highest Paying Companies

“Almost every day, nearly 112 million Americans wake up and go to work. The vast majority of them do so to put a roof over their head, food on the table, and otherwise support their chosen lifestyle. While full-time U.S. workers by definition clock in for at least 35 hours a week, the amount of… Continue Reading

This clever and stylish 1960 film is the most fun you’ll ever have at a physics lecture

This clever and stylish 1960 film is the most fun you’ll ever have at a physics lecture “Directed by the pioneering UK documentarian Richard Leacock, Frames of Reference is a slick and surreal dive into physics fundamentals and, in particular, why everything is indeed relative. Produced for high-school physics classes, the 1960 film features the physics… Continue Reading

Are Audiobooks As Good For You As Reading? Here’s What Experts Say

TIME: “Even for people who love books, finding the opportunity to read can be a challenge. Many, then, rely on audiobooks, a convenient alternative to old-fashioned reading. You can listen to the latest bestseller while commuting or cleaning up the house. But is listening to a book really the same as reading one? “I was… Continue Reading

How Did “OK” Become One of the Most Popular Words in the World?

KOTTKE.org: “Where did the word “OK” come from and how did it become so popular? [See this YoutTube video explainer] Young Boston intellectuals in the early 1800s used a humorous code of abbreviated phrases, like “KC,” or “knuff ced”; “KY,” “know yuse”; and “OW,” “oll wright.” And while most of them eventually fell out of… Continue Reading

California Climate Tracker – 1895 to present

“The analysis of climate variability and trends is necessary in managing natural resources and monitoring and understanding the role of climate change. California has a diverse climate, driven by its latitudinal extent, proximity to the Pacific Ocean and cold coastal waters, and complex terrain. From the snow-capped Sierra Nevada to the agricultural lands of the… Continue Reading