Study finds that ocean acidification is accelerated in nutrient-rich areas

by Sabrina I. Pacifici on September 24, 2012

NOAA: “Carbon dioxide released from decaying algal blooms, combined with ongoing increases in atmospheric carbon emissions, leads to increased levels of ocean acidification, and places additional stress on marine resources and the coastal economies that depend on them, according to a new study published today. Ocean acidification occurs when the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the breakdown of organic matter, which then causes a chemical reaction to make it more acidic. Species as diverse as scallops and corals are vulnerable to ocean acidification, which can affect the growth of their shells and skeletons. Research by NOAA’s William G. Sunda and Wei-jun Cai of the University of Georgia points to the process of eutrophication – the production of excess algae from increased nutrients, such as, nitrogen and phosphorus — as a large, often overlooked source of CO2 in coastal waters. When combined with increasing CO2 in the atmosphere, the release of CO2 from decaying organic matter is accelerating the acidification of coastal seawater.”

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