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Author Archives: Sabrina I. Pacifici

Maple Leaves: Discovering Canada through the Published Record

Lavoie, Brian. 2019. Maple Leaves: Discovering Canada through the Published Record. Dublin, OH: OCLC Research. https://doi.org/10.25333/ek4v-ag09. “The Canadian contribution to literature, music, film, and other forms of creative expression is rich and deep. In this report, we explore the contours of this contribution, as it is manifested in the collections of libraries around the world. Using WorldCat, the world’s largest and most comprehensive aggregation of data describing global library holdings, and mapping the information with Wikidata to identify publications authored or otherwise created by Canadians and Canadian organizations, we trace the boundaries of the Canadian presence in the published record: i.e., materials published in Canada, by Canadians, or about Canada. We then take a deeper dive into these materials, highlighting some distinctive features of the Canadian presence that help create a more detailed picture of how Canada and Canadians have influenced, and continue to influence, the broad sphere of the published record.

How big is Canada’s contribution to the published record? Using a methodology developed by OCLC Research and applied in several previous studies, 10.9 million distinct publications were identified in WorldCat that fell into at least one of the three categories of materials constituting the Canadian presence in the published record.

The largest work in Canadiana in terms of number of publications is Anne of Green Gables, by Prince Edward Island–born author Lucy Maud Montgomery. This work has been published and re-published over a thousand times!

Read the full report to find out the most “popular” works, authors, and more, along with shifting patterns over time, materials published in the languages of Indigenous peoples, and more trends revealed in the rich data made possible by WorldCat.”

PBS Frontline – Supreme Revenge

Season 37: Episode 14 – “Inside the no-holds-barred war for control of the Supreme Court. From Brett Kavanaugh to Robert Bork, an investigation of how a 30-year-old grievance transformed the court and turned confirmations into bitter, partisan conflicts.” See also Law.com [subscription req’d] – New Documentary Examines Supreme Court Confirmations From Bork to Kavanaugh. “The… Continue Reading

Motivated Secrecy: Politics, Relationships, and Regrets

Motivated Secrecy: Politics, Relationships, and Regrets. American Psychological Association 2019, Vol. 1, No. 999, 0002333-8113/19/  http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/mot0000139 “Recent work has explored the dynamics of secrecy and its outcomes, but has yet to examine the motivations people have for engaging in secrecy and how such motivations shape the experience of secrecy and its implications. We present a… Continue Reading

Where Democrats And Republicans Live In Your City

FiveThirtyEight – Republicans and Democrats tend not to live side-by-side, even when they live in the same city. “We’ve heard it over and over: Democratic candidates win cities. Researchers have tracked the way Democrats have dominated in cities since the ’90s. Politicians bring up America’s deep-blue cities constantly, including in stump speeches and in every… Continue Reading

Cross-Cultural Differences in Plagiarism: Fact or Fiction?

Simon, Diana, Cross-Cultural Differences in Plagiarism: Fact or Fiction? (April 24, 2019). Cross-Cultural Differences in Plagiarism: Fact or Fiction?, 57 Duquesne Law Review 73 (2019).; Arizona Legal Studies Discussion Paper No. 19-07. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3377725 – “Are there cross-cultural differences in plagiarism? Is it helpful—let alone fair—to try to generalize attitudes toward plagiarism across cultures?… Continue Reading

Global economy remains weak as subdued trade drags down growth

OECD Economic Outlook May 2019: “A year ago, the OECD warned about how trade and policy uncertainties could significantly damage the world economy and further contribute to the growing divide between people. A year later, global momentum has weakened markedly and growth is set to remain subpar as trade tensions persist. Trade and investment have… Continue Reading

Robots to take 400,000 finance jobs in the next decade

Opimas Report – Workforce of the Future:Transplanting Technology Skill Sets to the Capital Markets 2019-05-16 – “The post-crisis regulatory tsunami that hit the capital markets over the past 10 years has had a major impact on the global industry’s workforce. Despite strong downward pressure on margins, financial institutions embarked on massive recruitment for their risk… Continue Reading

Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress

“The Library of Congress’s mission is to engage, inspire, and inform the Congress and the American people with a universal and enduring source of knowledge and creativity. To accomplish that mission, the Library is adopting a digital-forward strategy that harnesses technology to bridge geographical divides, expand our reach, and enhance our services. This document describes… Continue Reading

May Federal Prosecutors Take Direction From the President?

Bruce A. Green and Rebecca Roiphe, May Federal Prosecutors Take Direction From the President?, 87 Fordham L. Rev. 1817 (2019). [h/t Mary Whisner] “Suppose the president sought to serve as prosecutor-in-chief, telling prosecutors when to initiate or dismiss criminal charges in individual cases and making other discretionary decisions that are normally reserved to trained professionals… Continue Reading

Recession Ready: Fiscal Policies to Stabilize the American Economy

This volume [256 pages] —a joint project by The Hamilton Project and the Washington Center for Equitable Growth—focuses on the workhorse antirecession programs known as “automatic stabilizers.” “The Great Recession is remembered, and properly so, for its massive destruction of household wealth and job losses that reached over 800,000 in a single month. In just… Continue Reading

House Intel Committee releases transcripts of Michael Cohen’s 2 day closed-door testimony

Cohen’s February 2019 testimony can be found here. Cohen’s March 2019 testimony can be found here. [May 20, 2019], the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence voted to release Michael Cohen’s testimony and related exhibits to the public by a vote of 12 – 7. Afterwards, Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) made the following statement: “With… Continue Reading