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Category Archives: Courts

Protecting the Legal Foundation of the Internet: 2019 in Review

EFF: “When someone says something unlawful online, they should be the one held responsible for it, not the website or platform where they said it. Section 230—the most important law protecting free speech online—reflects that common-sense principle. This year, EFF defended Section 230 in Congress, the courts, and on the Internet…” Continue Reading

Emojis Have Unsettled Grammar Rules

…and Why Lawyers Should Care – Eric Goldman – “A new article by three Dutch researchers sheds some fascinating light on the grammar of emojis, or more precisely, the lack thereof. Their abstract concludes: “while emoji may follow tendencies in their interactions with grammatical structure in multimodal text-emoji productions, they lack grammatical structure on their… Continue Reading

In memoriam: The brands we lost in the 2010s

Vox – In memoriam: The brands we lost in the 2010s – RIP Blockbuster, Borders, and so many more. “The 2010s were a decade of extreme retail innovation. Instagrammy direct-to-consumer companies like Warby Parker and Everlane sprang up seemingly overnight; hulking businesses like Amazon permeated what felt like every aspect of our shopping lives. There’s… Continue Reading

Fastcase and Casemaker Settle Copyright Litigation over Georgia Regs

Robert Ambrogi – LawSites:  The two legal research companies Fastcase and Casemaker have settled their three-year legal battle over Casemaker’s claims of copyright in Georgia administrative regulations. “In federal court in Atlanta, the two companies jointly filed a stipulated dismissal of the matter. The request did not not reveal the terms of the settlement, but… Continue Reading

What is the Difference between a Conclusion and a Fact?

Erichson, Howard M., What is the Difference between a Conclusion and a Fact? (August 1, 2019). Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 41, 2019, Forthcoming; Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 3439489. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3439489 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3439489 “In Ashcroft v. Iqbal, building on Bell Atlantic v. Twombly, the Supreme Court instructed district courts to treat… Continue Reading

What technology will courts be using in 5 years’ time?

National Center for State Courts – Court Technology Bulletin, December 5, 2019 – “We are pleased to share the following post from our friend, the Hon. Judge Andrea Tsalamandris from Melbourne, Australia on “how technology can be used by judges and court administration to create efficiencies in our courts, and enhance access to justice. As… Continue Reading

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues December 7, 2019

Via LLRX – Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues December 7, 2019 – Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the… Continue Reading

Court rules Nestlé cannot claim bottled water is ‘essential public service’

The Guardian UK – Nestlé cannot claim bottled water is ‘essential public service’, court rules. “Michigan’s second-highest court has dealt a legal blow to Nestlé’s Ice Mountain water brand, ruling that the company’s commercial water-bottling operation is “not an essential public service” or a public water supply. The court of appeals ruling is a victory… Continue Reading

Justices debate allowing state law to be “hidden behind a pay wall”

Ars Technica – “The courts have long held that laws can’t be copyrighted. But if the state mixes the text of the law together with supporting information, things get trickier. In Monday oral arguments, the US Supreme Court wrestled with the copyright status of Georgia’s official legal code, which includes annotations written by LexisNexis. The… Continue Reading

Why Second-Hand Ebook Market May Never Take Off

Fortune: “If you buy a physical book, you can sell it to someone else afterwards—that’s the basis of the longstanding second-hand book market, and it’s something people have taken for granted for generations. So can you do the same with electronic books? Not according to Europe’s highest court, which issued a ruling Thursday that could… Continue Reading