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Daily Archives: September 13, 2018

31 Highest Paying Companies

“Almost every day, nearly 112 million Americans wake up and go to work. The vast majority of them do so to put a roof over their head, food on the table, and otherwise support their chosen lifestyle. While full-time U.S. workers by definition clock in for at least 35 hours a week, the amount of money those workers earn for that time depends largely on the company that writes their paychecks. The federal government has set the minimum wage at $7.25 an hour. Someone working full-time in a minimum wage job would earn just over $15,000 in an year. Many major companies pay their entry-level associates the legally required minimum, as a result, average salaries at these companies are often less than $40,000. There are also dozens of companies at the other end of the spectrum, where entry-level workers and all other positions — from junior associates to senior management — are paid more. At these companies, the average salary across all positions extends well into the six-figure range. To identify the 31 highest paying companies, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the average pay in over 1,200 organizations with operations in the United States from compensation data company Payscale. The companies with the highest average salaries span a range of industries, including oil and gas, financial services, and computer software. The companies on this list offer generous compensation packages for good reason. Generally speaking, common positions at these businesses require highly skilled personnel who are in high demand. By paying high salaries, these companies can attract top talent. Additionally, acquiring the skills needed for many jobs at high-paying companies can be expensive. A software developer at Apple, research scientist at pharmaceutical company Novartis, or drilling engineer at ExxonMobil — all companies on this list — typically have some form of an advanced degree, in addition to a bachelor’s degree. The high salaries at these companies make the initial investment in education worthwhile for potential candidates…”

Click here to see the 31 highest paying companies.

Anti-Discrimination Center – new page mapping housing segregation

The Anti-Discrimination Center: May 3, 2018 – Segregated, really segregated, or ultra-segregated? — “The 50th anniversary of the passage of the Fair Housing Act has come and gone, but startling new maps from the Anti-Discrimination Center vividly show the depth and breadth of residential segregation in the United States.  Powered by Social Explorer, the maps allow… Continue Reading

White House’s website deleted the whole archive of its daily newsletters

Quartz: “American citizens can get daily updates on the government directly from the White House’s “1600 Daily” newsletter, which was launched in March 2017. The newsletter shares daily updates from the White House, together with a feed of positive news about Donald Trump’s administration (primarily from conservative outlets supportive of the government, such as Breitbart… Continue Reading

Facebook Expanding Fact-Checking to Photos and Videos

Facebook Newsroom: “We know that people want to see accurate information on Facebook, so for the last two years, we’ve made fighting misinformation a priority. One of the many steps we take to reduce the spread of false news is working with independent, third-party fact-checkers to review and rate the accuracy of content. To date,… Continue Reading

The State of the Digital Workplace 2018

The State of the Digital Workplace – This 2018 edition of the report reveals digital workplace strategies, challenges and keys to success from 450+ executives. Free Executive Summary: Measuring the digital workplace: The power of metrics in the connected workplace Free Report Digital Workplace 2030: Preparing now for the digital worlds of work to come… Continue Reading

This clever and stylish 1960 film is the most fun you’ll ever have at a physics lecture

This clever and stylish 1960 film is the most fun you’ll ever have at a physics lecture “Directed by the pioneering UK documentarian Richard Leacock, Frames of Reference is a slick and surreal dive into physics fundamentals and, in particular, why everything is indeed relative. Produced for high-school physics classes, the 1960 film features the physics… Continue Reading

Testimony – Transparency at CBO: An Update

Testimony on Transparency at CBO: An Update | Congressional Budget Office – Keith Hall, Director Before the Committee on the Budget United States Senate September 13, 2018. “…Transparency can mean many different things, so letme begin by highlighting CBO’s three goals in being transparent: First, we aim to enhance the credibility of our work by… Continue Reading

California just replaced cash bail with algorithms

Quartz: “Instead of leaving cash as collateral for freedom before a trial in court, those accused of crimes in California will be graded by an algorithm, starting in October 2019. A county official will then take that grade and use it to recommend whether the accused should be released or remain in jail. California governor… Continue Reading

Are Audiobooks As Good For You As Reading? Here’s What Experts Say

TIME: “Even for people who love books, finding the opportunity to read can be a challenge. Many, then, rely on audiobooks, a convenient alternative to old-fashioned reading. You can listen to the latest bestseller while commuting or cleaning up the house. But is listening to a book really the same as reading one? “I was… Continue Reading

How Did “OK” Become One of the Most Popular Words in the World?

KOTTKE.org: “Where did the word “OK” come from and how did it become so popular? [See this YoutTube video explainer] Young Boston intellectuals in the early 1800s used a humorous code of abbreviated phrases, like “KC,” or “knuff ced”; “KY,” “know yuse”; and “OW,” “oll wright.” And while most of them eventually fell out of… Continue Reading